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POTTERY OF THE WORLD

The Central Bank of Armenia issued Armenian pottery, Russian pottery, Greek pottery, Iranian pottery, Chinese pottery silver collector coins on 18th October 2018.

Armenian pottery

The ancient clay objects found in the Armenian Highland refer to the 7th millennium BC. With gradual improvements in the potter’s craft ceramics acquired variety of forms and ornaments, thus giving rise to terracotta and colored ceramics. In the Middle Ages Dvin and Ani, the capitals of Armenia, were major centers of Armenian pottery. Here, the Armenian artisans made belt-garnished crockery and glazed faience.

From the 15th century, a settlement Kyutahia (Kutina) in historical Armenia was famous for production of Armenian ceramics. The Armenian ceramists in Kyutahia greatly contributed to the development of pottery in the region. Their works decorated many churches and buildings, were exported to European countries.

An earlier 18th century clay censer, with depiction of a cross and the Armenian scripture dedicated to the Holy Mother of God, is one example of the Armenian pottery from Kyutahia.
The clay censer is preserved in the Cincinnati Art Museum (Ohio, USA). 

Obverse: the coat of arms of the Republic of Armenia and national ornaments.
Reverse: the clay censer against the Armenian ornament.

Face value: 1000 dram
Metal/fineness: silver 925
Diameter (mm): 40 × 40
Weight: 31,1 g
Quality: proof
Edge: ribbed 
Quantity: up to 2000 pcs
Designed by Harutyun Samuelyan.
Minted in the Mint of Poland.

Russian pottery

The Imperial Porcelain Factory established in St. Petersburg by the decree of Empress Elizabeth I in 1744 is a large center of Russian ceramics production. A team led by Russian scientist D. Vinogradov, came up with their own porcelain formula, using the local clay features.

The gilded vessel used for bottle cooling is a sample of Russian porcelain, made by sculptor Pimenov’s design in early 19th century. The vessel has a colorful coating and over-glazed polychrome finish, illustrating the views of St. Petersburg. Count Guriev donated the vessel to Emperor Alexander I to mark the victory over the Napoleon Bonaparte troops, and later the name “Guriev” was labelled to it.
The vessel is preserved in the Imperial Porcelain Factory Museum (State Hermitage Department, Russia).

Obverse: the coat of arms of the Republic of Armenia and national ornaments.
Reverse: the bottle cooling vessel against the Russian ornament.

Face value: 1000 dram
Metal/fineness: silver 925
Diameter (mm): 40 × 40
Weight: 31,1 g
Quality: proof
Edge: ribbed 
Quantity: up to 1500 pcs


Designed by Harutyun Samuelyan.
Minted in the Mint of Poland.

Greek pottery

Pottery holds a special place in the ancient Greek decorative and applied art. It is characterized by the diversity of clay vessels and the harmony of the graphic and vivid elements.

In the ancient world, Attica was one of the most important centers of Greek pottery. Starting from the 6th century BC, the craftsmen in Athens were busy perfecting the ancient Corinthian methods of producing pottery, creating unique pieces of Attic ceramics. The yellowish tones of Corinthian ceramics were gradually replaced by red colors, making the blackish images more daring and expressive.

Nowadays, thousands of copies of Greek decorated vessels are kept in the world museums and private collections.

A 6th century BC scythe, which is unique by illustration, is one of the examples of Ancient Greek pottery. The process of making ceramics is trimmed around the vessel.

The Greek pot is preserved in one of the Harvard’s Art Museums (Massachusetts, USA).

Obverse: the coat of arms of the Republic of Armenia and national ornaments.

Reverse: the clay scythe against the Greek ornament.

Obverse: the coat of arms of the Republic of Armenia and national ornaments.

Reverse: the bottle cooling vessel against the Russian ornament.

Face value: 1000 dram

Metal/fineness: silver 925

Diameter (mm): 40 × 40

Weight: 31,1 g

Quality: proof

Edge: ribbed 

Quantity: up to 1500 pcs

Designed by Harutyun Samuelyan.

Minted in the Mint of Poland.

Iranian pottery

The art of Iranian pottery contains the best traditions of Iranian sculpture, painting and architecture. Kashan is one of the centers of production of Iranian pottery. This settlement became known for innovative methods in the creation of pottery. Kashan is famous for having developed a special formula for double clay baking, which allowed Kashan to maintain the originality of the art of glazing. Ceramic slabs made of this type were widely spread in the 13th-14th centuries.

A 13th century porcelain slab is one sample of Iranian pottery; it represents an octagonal star specific to Iranian culture, with pictures of the tree of life and speckled rabbits in the center. The edges of the slab carry Persian inscriptions taken from the epic poem “Shahnameh”.
The Iranian porcelain slab is preserved in the British Museum (London, Great Britain).

Obverse: the coat of arms of the Republic of Armenia and national ornaments.
Reverse: the porcelain slab against the Iranian ornament.

Face value: 1000 dram
Metal/fineness: silver 925
Diameter (mm): 40 × 40
Weight: 31,1 g
Quality: proof
Edge: ribbed 
Quantity: up to 1500 pcs

Designed by Harutyun Samuelyan.
Minted in the Mint of Poland.

Chinese pottery

The history of development of Chinese ceramics and its rich culture illustrate the centuries-old origin of pottery. The forms and colors of ancient clay objects created by Chinese craftsmen gradually took more elegant forms and delicate tints. Subsequently, due to improvements in clay processing technologies the porcelain emerged in China and marked the beginning of production of porcelain items.

Jingdezhen, a town in China’s Jiangxi Province, is known as the “Porcelain Capital” as it was built on a clay soil. Emperor Jingde decreed all the pieces made for court to be marked “made in the Jingde period” and subsequently the city changed its name to Jingdezhen.
The plate made during the reign of Dynasty Qin is an example of Jingdechian porcelain, painted with cobalt on a white background and over-glazed transparent layer depicting the dragon. 
The porcelain plate is preserved in the Xinjiang Museum (Henan Province, China).

Obverse: the coat of arms of the Republic of Armenia and national ornaments.
Reverse: the porcelain plate against the Chinese ornament.

Face value: 1000 dram
Metal/fineness: silver 925
Diameter (mm): 40 × 40
Weight: 31,1 g
Quality: proof
Edge: ribbed 
Quantity: up to 1500 pcs


Designed by Harutyun Samuelyan.
Minted in the Mint of Poland.

Armenian pottery

Russian pottery

Greek pottery

Iranian pottery

Chinese pottery